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Jennifer Garner wonders ‘what it does to an adolescent brain’ to see her made up

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Jennifer Garner has a new interview With People magazine to promote her Neutrogena partnership. It’s one of those standard beauty interviews, but she is so not into makeup and getting her hair done. She often goes out in her day-to-day life without makeup and with wet hair looking like she’s busy and can’t be bothered. That’s completely her prerogative and I get the impression that she would never wear makeup if she didn’t have to do it for her job. In her People magazine she says that her kids must find it confusing to see her everyday without makeup and then to see her made up with her hair done. It sounds like she doesn’t feel like herself when she wears makeup and has her hair hone. “I think it’s probably extra complicated when you literally were nursed in the makeup chair as an infant, and have grown up sitting in your mom’s lap while she got her makeup done your whole life,” the actress and Neutrogena brand ambassador tells PEOPLE.”My kids know two versions of me: They know the version that I see in the mirror right now that looks crazy, and it’s what they see 90 percent of the time,” Garner reveals of son Samuel Garner, 7, plus daughters Seraphina Rose Elizabeth, 10, and Violet Anne, 13.”Other times, they see a version of me that I never saw with my mom or anything, where I’m done up, my hair’s done, my makeup is done, so I wonder what that puts in mind,” she shares. “Not to put words in her mouth, but I do wonder what it does to an adolescent brain.”Garner hopes that her three children “see that I’m the happiest and most comfortable when I just look like myself,””I think whatever version of growing up they need to do around that, if they can come back to this in the end, we’re good to go,” Garner explains of the example she strives to set.Garner’s kids are growing up fast — which, for Violet, means she’s starting to “explore and play with makeup” more…However, “She’s really smart about, ‘Okay, now I’m leaving the house, now I need to check with my mom because chances are she’s gonna make me take this lip off,’ ” says Garner. “Which, I do.””That’s kind of where we are with it,” adds the Alias alum of her oldest child. “It’s a process. Growing up is a process.” She’s not telling anyone else that they shouldn’t wear makeup or that they’re not themselves without makeup, but as a regular makeup-wearer this is foreign to me. I wear makeup every day and I love it. At first I thought she was saying that her kids can get confused to see her with makeup. I realized she means her daughter is at an age where she’s being influenced by the media and that she doesn’t want to set that example, that you’re not enough without makeup. Again, as someone who likes to wear makeup you can teach your children that it’s a personal choice. She’s so vague about it that it’s hard to know what she’s saying though. At least she’s a spokesperson for Neutrogena and not Maybelline or Revlon. I have to get a little snarky for a minute. Kids notice Botox and fillers too.Celebitchy

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